Castello pipe dating

castello pipe dating

How many pipes does Castello make a year?

Today Castello averages about 6,000 pipes a year. Approximately 3,000 pipes will fall into the smooth Trademark, Castello, Perla Nera, and Collection. Roughly 600 pipes will receive the Old Antiquari stamp, and 2400 will be produced as Sea Rock, Old Sea Rock, Natural Vergin and Epoca.

How well do you know Marco Castello?

Marco is extremely knowledgeable about pipes, so it is not surprising that Castello entrusts its distribution in the United States to Marco, and he in turn entrusts Bob Hamlin of Virginia with the responsibility of getting Castello pipes to as many American collectors as possible. Marco has a charismatic smile and a natural friendliness about him.

What happened to the Castello flame pipe finish?

During their 2 first production years, the Castellos Flame pipes were not stamped Flame. The Castello Flame finish succeeded the Epoca and was carved by the same craftsman who used to create the Epocas. He retired about 2009-2010 and since the Flame finish isnt produced anymore.

How did Castello pipe get its name?

That mans name is Carlo Scotti, and his pipe brand is called Castello. Carlos choice for his companys name was an inspired one. He needed a name that had a cognate in many of the European languages (Castle, Castillo, Castelo (Portuguese)), and wanted that name to be evocative of pleasant fantasy.

How many in stock of Castello pipes?

Always 80+ in stock. Castello pipes were started by Carlo Scotti in 1947, in Cantu,Italy. He defined the modern neo-classical Italian pipe and established the Castello pipe as the mark of quality. Castello pipes would take Carlo Scotti from a tiny artisan studio and anonymity, to a state of the art production facility and the top of the pipe world.

What happened to the Castello flame pipe finish?

During their 2 first production years, the Castellos Flame pipes were not stamped Flame. The Castello Flame finish succeeded the Epoca and was carved by the same craftsman who used to create the Epocas. He retired about 2009-2010 and since the Flame finish isnt produced anymore.

How many old Italian pipes are there?

Roughly 600 pipes will receive the Old Antiquari stamp, and 2400 will be produced as Sea Rock, Old Sea Rock, Natural Vergin and Epoca. US production pipes have returned to the white bar, and Castello is still considered by many to remain the zenith of the handmade Italian pipe.

Is Castello still the zenith of handmade Italian pipes?

US production pipes have returned to the white bar, and Castello is still considered by many to remain the zenith of the handmade Italian pipe. Carlo Scotti has passed. But his vision is in Kino’s great hands, and his legacy is assured.

What is a Castello pipe?

Carlo Scotti created the Castello pipe in 1947, in a little artisan workshop. His aim was to produce a pipe which was technically and aesthetically at the absolute summit of the quality parametro. This quality means many things which are hard to explain. It means working only and exclusively the best briar, that is: extra-extra.

How did Castello get its name?

He needed a name that had a cognate in many of the European languages (Castle, Castillo, Castelo (Portuguese)), and wanted that name to be evocative of pleasant fantasy. While the name did have a dream like quality, the start up of Castello, and the early years of the company were more akin to a nightmare.

What does the k mean in Castello pipes?

The company began to use the letter “K” to denote the grain quality of a smooth pipe, and the size designation of a carved. Today Castello averages about 6,000 pipes a year. Approximately 3,000 pipes will fall into the smooth Trademark, Castello, Perla Nera, and Collection.

What is a pipa Castello?

Pipa Castello Courtesy of italianpipemakers.com Pipa Castello was born in 1947 in the artisan workshop of Carlo Scotti in Via Fossano, in Cantù, with the target to produce pipes which could be placed at the very top of quality and perfection from both the technical and aesthetical side.

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